ARIA Charts Throwback: 29 October 1989
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ARIA Charts Throwback: 29 October 1989

October 25, 2018

Come everybody, c-c-come everybody and hear the biggest hits of October 1989.

As 1989 headed into its final weeks, the ARIA Albums Chart was dominated by the likes of Richard Marx, John Williamson, Kate Ceberano, Ian Moss, Tracy Chapman, Eurythmics and more.

The top spot on the Singles Chart was held by an innovative novelty track that was a little bit old and a little bit new.

10. Roxette - Dressed For Success

Following up ‘The Look’ (#1 Jul. ’89), Swedish duo Roxette scored the second of their seven Top Ten hits on the ARIA Charts when ‘Dressed For Success’ peaked at #3 for four straight weeks in September/October 1989. The pair’s second album, Look Sharp! (#2 Oct. ’89) also spawned the Top Ten hits ‘Listen To Your Heart’ (#10 Nov. ’89) and ‘Dangerous’ (#9 May ’90).



9. U2 - All I Want Is You

‘All I Want Is You’ became the second-biggest hit from Rattle And Hum (#1 Oct. ’88) when it hit #2 for three weeks in September/October 1989. In total, U2, has had 23 Top Ten hits on the ARIA Singles Chart, including five #1s.



8. Martika - Toy Soldiers

American singer-songwriter Martika took out the first of her three Top Tens on the ARIA Singles Chart when ‘Toy Soldiers’ hit #5 in October 1989. She would later chart with a version of ‘I Feel the Earth Move’ (#2 Jan. ’90) and ‘Love… Thy Will Be Done’ (#1 Oct. ’91).



7. Jenny Morris - She Has To Be Loved

Peaking at #5 for two weeks in November 1989, ‘She Has To Be Loved’ became Jenny Morris’ first Top Ten on the ARIA Singles Chart. Morris’ album Shiver also peaked at #5 for two weeks around the same time. She later scored her biggest hit with ‘Break In The Weather’ (#2 Oct. ’91).



6. Grayson Hugh - Talk It Over

The only hit on the ARIA Singles Chart for American singer-songwriter Grayson Hugh came when ‘Talk It Over’ peaked at #4 for a week in November 1989. The track was also recorded by Olivia Newton-John and released on her 1988 album The Rumour (#30 Oct. ’88).



5. Richard Marx - Right Here Waiting

‘Right Here Waiting’ became the first of American singer-songwriter Richard Marx’s two #1s on the ARIA Singles Chart when it held the top spot for five weeks in September/October 1989. Marx held #1 on the Albums Chart for seven weeks with Repeat Offender at the same time, holding #1 on both charts for four weeks in a row.



4. Tina Turner - The Best

Tina Turner took out her third solo Top Ten on the ARIA Singles Chart when ‘The Best’ peaked at #4 for two weeks at the end of 1989. Originally released by Bonnie Tyler in 1988, Turner’s version of ‘The Best’ became the theme tune to the New South Wales Rugby League in the early-90s.



3. Alice Cooper - Poison

Shock rocker Alice Cooper scored his first Top Ten single in Australia for over a decade when ‘Poison’ peaked at #3 for three weeks in October/November 1989. The comeback album Trash also returned Cooper to the Top Ten of the Albums Chart when it peaked at #5 in December 1989.



2. Cher - If I Could Turn Back Time

Cher took out the first ARIA #1 single of her illustrious career when ‘If I Could Turn Back Time’ spent seven weeks in the top spot in the final months of 1989. Taken from the album Heart of Stone (#1 Nov. ’89), the single debuted at #28, before hitting #1 for the first time in its fifth week in the top 50. A decade later, she’d top the chart again with ‘Believe’ (#1 Feb. ’99).



1. Jive Bunny And The Mastermixers - Swing The Mood

The brainchild of a collective of British DJs/producers, Jive Bunny & The Mastermixers nabbed their only #1 on the ARIA Singles Chart when ‘Swing The Mood’ spent three weeks in the top spot in October/November 1989. The outfit used sampling and synthesizers to combine older pop music into medleys. ‘Swing The Mood’ combined pieces by Glenn Miller, Elvis Presley, Little Richard, Chubby Checker, The Everly Brothers and more. Jive Bunny & The Mastermixers also spent four weeks at #1 on the Albums Chart with The Album. Their only other Top Ten single was ‘That’s What I Like’ (#4 Nov. ’89).